Why ethical fashion is made for referral marketing

ethical fashion for referrals

The days when consumers would support brands without knowing anything about them are over. The internet has made it easier than ever to learn about the ethics and practices of companies which consumers support. Companies with track records of ethical missteps or questionable policies can’t hide those blunders anymore. Instead, they bear the brunt of bad social media buzz, which can have a very real impact on their stock prices and overall reputations.

In 2014, American Apparel founder and CEO, Dov Charney, was ousted over a series of misconduct allegations. Charney has been sued by multiple former employees for sexual harassment and other forms of misconduct. His behavior—and his ongoing legal battle with American Apparel—has been blamed for tarnishing the company’s legacy as a fashion business that emphasized a “Made in the USA” mission. Charney’s oust caused a rapid drop in American Apparel’s stock prices. While American Apparel’s woes have largely been linked to these issues of misconduct, there is another major area in which consumers’ brand expectations are growing: sustainability.

Data shows that modern consumers want to support sustainable companies. According to an international Unilever survey, one third of all consumers prefer


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How cosmetics Brands can Jenner-ate more income

A Quick Summary for Your Busy Day: (45 second read)

Cosmetics companies who develop and sell their own products have never had more opportunity to bring their products to market.

The past five years have seen a rapid rise in the availability (and affordability) of selling products online through ecommerce platforms such as Big Commerce, Hybris, Shopify, Magento, and WooCommerce, which has made it easier than ever to launch products to a wide audience without having to invest in costly brick and mortar stores.

The challenge remains to make prospective customers aware of new product and brand launches. Cosmetics companies are turning to paid celebrity endorsers - influencers - in the hopes that their social media posts will lead to increased sales. It’s working, but costs are rising. Influencers are demanding higher and higher fees and brands are struggling to justify the cost and track the benefits.

This article shows that influencer marketing can be a powerful force for growth. But perhaps cosmetics brands shouldn’t be making those expensive gambles. Perhaps counterintuitively, going small means going big.

Nano-influencers from within brands’ own customer bases can represent the lowest cost and highest ROI.


BRANDS BIG AND SMALL ARE TURNING


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Airbnb: travelling in the wrong direction

arghbnb

We recently launched a world-class referral programme for Expedia, the world’s biggest travel company. We couldn’t be more excited to have partnered with a brand that’s been revered as an ecommerce pioneer for over 20 years. And we’re delighted to bring their millions of happy customers a refer-a-friend scheme that’s more powerful, more engaging and more effective than anything the travel industry’s ever seen.

Of course, when you think referral and travel, one brand currently springs to mind: Airbnb, who became a household name on the back of their referral programme. In fact, Airbnb (along with Dropbox and Uber) just about wrote the referral rulebook - so you’d assume their scheme would be right up there with the very best. But here’s the thing: if you take a look at Airbnb’s referral programme, it’s actually starting to look worryingly out of date.

So that’s exactly what we’ve done. Below, you’ll find our expert take on Airbnb’s refer-a-friend scheme. But, first, a little history…

Airbnb Referral 1.0

Airbnb’s referral programme didn’t always look like it does now. In fact, they didn’t even have


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Yoo-hoo, we're working with boohoo!

Boohoo

Smashing it since 2006, the UK-based fashion firm boohoo is both an ecommerce icon and a multi-billion-pound empire, parenting other hugely-successful brands including Pretty Little Thing and the US phenomenon, Nasty Gal.

So, it goes without saying that Buyapowa are incredibly honoured to be powering their first ever refer-a-friend programme. As of today, millions of boohoo customers can introduce their friends and earn £5 credit to spend at boohoo.com (we’re guessing a lot of that credit’s going to be spent on boohoo’s headline-grabbing new collaboration with the ultimate It girl, Paris Hilton), while their friends will each receive 25% off their first shop. Better still, thanks to Buyapowa’s unique gamification feature, everyone who successfully refers a friend will get the chance to win a holiday worth £1000.

Boohoo

This exciting launch cements Buyapowa's position as the world's leading referral platform for fashion brands and retailers, coming hot on the heels of recent launches for the likes of ASOS, Gap, Zalando and River Island. It's a position we don't take lightly, and that's why - just like boohoo - we never stop creating and delivering products our customers want, need and love.

Stay tuned for updates about


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An army of lovers: the surprising new stars of influencer marketing

influencer army

Once a function of PR, but now very much embedded within everyone's marketing strategies, influencer marketing is the biggest game in town. But, in the light of recent reports highlighting the untrustworthiness of many influencers, is it time to think again?

We explore the past, present and future of influencer marketing, and take a look at the technology that's helping marketers engage millions of genuine voices with genuine influence, delivering genuine results.


The internet was supposed to save us from marketing bunkum. Gone were the days of super-expensive creative, plastered over billboards and magazines and televisions with nebulous impact. This was a new dawn, where everything was measurable, where scale kept prices down and where campaigns could be tweaked or switched in a heartbeat.

Then the internet broke.

Ad-blockers went all ad-blocky and blocked all the ads, leaving the field clear for giants like Facebook and Google to scoff up all the scale and inflate their prices accordingly. And the interweaving of customer-service with social meant that people were far more likely to respond to a sponsored post by grumbling about the last thing they bought from you than they ever were to go and buy anything else.

So, along


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