Why ethical fashion is made for referral marketing

ethical fashion for referrals

The days when consumers would support brands without knowing anything about them are over. The internet has made it easier than ever to learn about the ethics and practices of companies which consumers support. Companies with track records of ethical missteps or questionable policies can’t hide those blunders anymore. Instead, they bear the brunt of bad social media buzz, which can have a very real impact on their stock prices and overall reputations.

In 2014, American Apparel founder and CEO, Dov Charney, was ousted over a series of misconduct allegations. Charney has been sued by multiple former employees for sexual harassment and other forms of misconduct. His behavior—and his ongoing legal battle with American Apparel—has been blamed for tarnishing the company’s legacy as a fashion business that emphasized a “Made in the USA” mission. Charney’s oust caused a rapid drop in American Apparel’s stock prices. While American Apparel’s woes have largely been linked to these issues of misconduct, there is another major area in which consumers’ brand expectations are growing: sustainability.

Data shows that modern consumers want to support sustainable companies. According to an international Unilever survey, one third of all consumers prefer


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How cosmetics Brands can Jenner-ate more income

A Quick Summary for Your Busy Day: (45 second read)

Cosmetics companies who develop and sell their own products have never had more opportunity to bring their products to market.

The past five years have seen a rapid rise in the availability (and affordability) of selling products online through ecommerce platforms such as Big Commerce, Hybris, Shopify, Magento, and WooCommerce, which has made it easier than ever to launch products to a wide audience without having to invest in costly brick and mortar stores.

The challenge remains to make prospective customers aware of new product and brand launches. Cosmetics companies are turning to paid celebrity endorsers - influencers - in the hopes that their social media posts will lead to increased sales. It’s working, but costs are rising. Influencers are demanding higher and higher fees and brands are struggling to justify the cost and track the benefits.

This article shows that influencer marketing can be a powerful force for growth. But perhaps cosmetics brands shouldn’t be making those expensive gambles. Perhaps counterintuitively, going small means going big.

Nano-influencers from within brands’ own customer bases can represent the lowest cost and highest ROI.


BRANDS BIG AND SMALL ARE TURNING


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Airbnb: travelling in the wrong direction

arghbnb

We recently launched a world-class referral programme for Expedia, the world’s biggest travel company. We couldn’t be more excited to have partnered with a brand that’s been revered as an ecommerce pioneer for over 20 years. And we’re delighted to bring their millions of happy customers a refer-a-friend scheme that’s more powerful, more engaging and more effective than anything the travel industry’s ever seen.

Of course, when you think referral and travel, one brand currently springs to mind: Airbnb, who became a household name on the back of their referral programme. In fact, Airbnb (along with Dropbox and Uber) just about wrote the referral rulebook - so you’d assume their scheme would be right up there with the very best. But here’s the thing: if you take a look at Airbnb’s referral programme, it’s actually starting to look worryingly out of date.

So that’s exactly what we’ve done. Below, you’ll find our expert take on Airbnb’s refer-a-friend scheme. But, first, a little history…

Airbnb Referral 1.0

Airbnb’s referral programme didn’t always look like it does now. In fact, they didn’t even have


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12 ways to ruin your referral programme

Common referral pitfalls

Referral marketing is the fastest-growing form of customer acquisition - so much so that it’s becoming increasingly hard to find a successful brand which doesn’t operate some kind of refer-a-friend scheme.

It’s also fundamentally simple: your existing fans and customers are rewarded for telling their friends about you, those friends are incentivised to shop, everyone’s happy.

But, just because referral’s simple, that doesn’t mean there aren’t a number of things that can go badly awry. Sidestepping these pitfalls is easy (especially if you select a referral platform designed to avoid them), but you need to know where to look.

And that’s exactly what we’re going to show you in the slides below, citing examples where some brands have stumbled into these pitfalls while others have safely avoided them. Let’s go...


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If you're launching a referral programme, or you're worried you might be making some of these mistakes, just get in touch. We'll help you set everything right.

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12 Möglichkeiten: Ihr Empfehlungsprogramm zu zerstören

Empfehlungsmarketing- allgemeine stolperfallen

Empfehlungsmarketing ist eines der beliebtesten Methoden der Kundenakquise - so sehr, dass es kaum noch einen Markenführer gibt, der keine Art von Empfehlungsmarketing-Programm hat.

Es ist relativ einfach: Ihre Fans und Kunden werden belohnt, wenn diese Ihnen bei der Werbung neuer Kunden durch Empfehlung an Freunde helfen. Die Geworbenen werden ebenfalls belohnt. Geteilte Freude ist eben doppelte Freude.

Obwohl Empfehlungsmarketing relativ einfach ist, bedeutet es nicht, dass alles immer reibungslos verläuft. Um die Stolperfallen zu vermeiden, müssen Sie wissen worauf Sie zu achten haben.

Hier zeigen wir Ihnen Beispiele ,Tipps & Tricks sowie Wissenswertes zum Thema wie man die Stolperfallen vermeiden kann.


Als PDF herunterladen (2.2MB)

Wenn Sie ein Empfehlung Programm starten, oder Sie haben Angst, dass Sie einige diese Fehler machen werden, bleiben Sie einfach in Kontakt. Wir werden Ihnen helfen alles gut zu sortieren.


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