Sorry, Hubspot. Social media is NOTHING like sex.

Social Media Is Nothing Like Sex

I just stumbled upon an old blog post from the fine ladies and gentlemen at Hubspot, trying to convince me that Social Media Is A Lot Like Sex.

It's not. And here's 10 reasons why...

  • Social media is all about doing it in public.

  • 57% of marketers have acquired customers via blogging. Fewer than 52% of them have acquired customers via sex. Possibly significantly fewer.

  • It's okay to charge for social media.

  • And it's fine to tweet your siblings.

  • Almost eight new people come onto the internet every second. (This one doesn't really work, but it made us snigger.)

  • Social media spreads the word. Sex just spreads cooties.

  • The average UK user spends over 26 minutes on Facebook every day. If there's an equivalent stat for sex then no wonder our economy's in a mess.

  • The average Twitter user has 27 followers, but most of the ones who follow @KimKardashian have zero sexual partners.

  • 42% of employers say no to any use of social media in the workplace. Yeah, even at the office Christmas party. Prudes.

  • My wife enjoys social media.


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How to offer discounts without trashing your brand

How to use discounts without trashing your brand

"The only statistics you can trust are those you falsified yourself," said William Churchill and, given that he reputedly drank 42,000 bottles of Pol Roget champagne in his lifetime, you'd hope there's some truth in that. Here's a little nugget of purest nonsense we stumbled upon recently, based on research carried out by The Logic Group and Ipsos MORI.

According to their survey of over 2,000 customers, people are more likely to be motivated to shop by earning loyalty points (27%) than they are by discounts (11%) or offers (9%).

We smell a rat. A fishy rat. We're not saying that the survey isn't 100% accurate, but there's no way those 2,000 people answered that question that way, so maybe something's been lost in translation (from English to... um...). Loyalty schemes are great, but no one's going to accrue rewards tomorrow instead of reaping benefits today. It's just not going to happen.

But here's where we do agree with The Logic Group (quoted here): “Brand Britain has become eroded as a result of rampant discounting across the board. By ‘flogging’ merchandise through widespread discounting, the prestige of many British brands is being compromised.” That's absolutely true because,


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A GREAT Social Commerce Infographic

social commerce report

Wow. The US-based 8thBridge just released an absolutely enormous 111-page report on social commerce, which we're going to spend a lot of time devouring. But the headline findings are already very interesting:

  • 70% of respondents would rather hear about a new product from a Facebook friend, than from a brand

  • 57% have asked their friends on Facebook for advice before purchasing a product

  • 64% said that more Facebook “likes” on a product do not increase the likelihood that they will buy that product

  • 35% of companies researched had apps on Facebook that were not functioning and/or were out of date

  • Growth areas include website social apps, Facebook custom open graph integration  and social logins

  • The most social companies are 17 times more likely to incorporate social functionality into their websites

  • Rewards are critical to encourage sharing and customer referrals

  • The past was about driving brand awareness. The future is about driving commerce.

Here's some of those findings in a nice, print-out-and-keep infographic. And stay tuned - we'll be deep diving into this behemouth of a report over the coming weeks.

Robin Bresnark

Infographic Via 8thBridge


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Turf war! Retail VS Publishing.

Turf war! Retail v publishing

The French word for shop is 'magasin'. We reckon they're onto something, the French (beyond the nice art and the poodles and stuff), because magazines and retail go together like snails and garlic butter.

Except it's the wrong way round. Instead of publishers exerting their incredible influence and ready-made audiences to do something magical with retail, they've let the shopkeepers jump them gun on them and launch their own magazines.

And now, guess what? Tesco Magazine is the most read publication in the UK. Bigger than The Daily Mail. Bigger than The Sun. Bigger than Cage And Aviary Birds. Amazing.

It's time for the publishers to fight back, but making pennies from a cruddy bolt-on affiliate store is not the answer. Social commerce is the answer. Here's five big reasons why:

1) Social Commerce is a form of e-commerce that editors can get behind; it allows editorial teams to curate a product roster and add real value to an e-commerce offering.

2) At the same time, social commerce empowers readers rather than exploiting them. It helps grow community by rewarding readers instead of scaring them off with hard sales.

3) Rather than making a slim margin from sales (or an


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Turn on your Facebook (*shocking stats inside*)

Shocking Facebook Stats

Some amazing stats from the Mediabistro AllFacebook Marketing Conference this morning, where Vincent Sider, VP of Social Media for the BBC's commercial arm, BBC Worldwide, bemoaned the impact of Facebook's new EdgeRank algorithms. For anyone who's not run into this problem, Facebook recently tweaked its backend settings to prevent so much corporate content from reaching Fans' News Feeds. As a consequence, some brands' posts are now reportedly seen by as few as 6% of their Fans. Yep, just six percent. Pretty hard to get return on that investment.

This has hit BBC Worldwide hard. Vincent reported that Facebook's EdgeRank changes resulted in 27.8% fewer visits from Facebook to the Top Gear website, while average daily reach as a % of fans plummeted from 38% in July to just 14% in October. The net result? A loss of revenue of £139,755 for Top Gear.

Facebook's solution? If you want to reach more people, you should consider promoting your great content with sponsored stories and paid-for promoted posts. That's fair enough - they're a business. But, Vincent Sider reckons that he'd have to spend £300,000 each and every month to make up the shortfall in referral traffic, which is simply


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