HOW TO: drive shoppers into physical stores using social

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Do you work in retail? Does the word 'multichannel' feature in your title or your job spec? Then you probably spend every working hour figuring out how to harmonise your online and offline offerings: developing strategies, finding synergies and delivering sales across channels.

But I bet you've ignored social - especially when it comes to using social to deliver sales instore.

Don't worry. It's not too late to start, and we're going to give you some fuss-free ideas any retailer can implement which are guaranteed to make a real difference. Sounds good? Then, let's go...

We’ve all seen how social can dramatically expand reach, decrease acquisition costs and drive sales (just flick through this blog for 1001 examples). And social is, essentially, a digital medium - so it makes a certain amount of sense that it should be used to guide potential customers to digital destinations. But only using social to power e-commerce is like only using your car to drive to streets beginning with vowels: a massive underuse of available resources.

Of course, if you do want to use social to help your physical offering, you need to focus on footfall. Footfall is everything in the world of


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Brands listen up; get your products off the shelves - and put them on pedestals instead!

Cosmeticsonapedestal

Place your products where they belong: on pedestals

Ecommerce has rewritten the playbook for Direct to Consumer (or ‘D2C’). Where once it meant clunky mail-order, 28-day delivery windows and fulfilment courtesy of a man with a van, it now means state-of-the-art payment processing, next day shipping and as many whizz-bang plug-ins as your server can handle. More importantly, D2C lets brands develop their relationship with their customers at the most pivotal point: the bit where they stop looking up and start coughing up. That’s huge.

So why is most D2C so painfully uninspiring? Let’s take a look at Dyson for a second. You’d expect the most innovative company in the UK to do something really different and exciting with the ‘Shop’ section of their website, but no. You browse to a category, you choose a product, you add it to a basket and you checkout. That’s exactly the same, innovation-free experience you’d have at Currys, or Amazon, or John Lewis. The only real difference? You’re likely to pay about 25% less if you shop around than if you buy direct.

Which is crazy. Brands should be putting their products on a pedestal, not on


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Entertainment retail in 2015: as much fun as a Soviet potato queue

Entertainment retail: about as much fun as a Soviet potato queue

Why is it that one of the most creative industries on the planet chooses to sell their wares in such a boring unimaginative way? Entertainment retail has been ripe for reinvention for a long time, so thank goodness the studios are finally stepping up and having a go.

When it comes to selling online, the entertainment industry has always been more “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn” than “I’m gonna make him an offer he can’t refuse.” You take your product - be it a movie, an album, a book, whatever - you chuck the packshot next to an ‘add to basket’ button and you wait for Joe Schmo to come along and purchase. From Joe’s point of view, he browses or searches, he clicks and fills in some forms, then he waits - either for a package to land on his doormat or a download to land on his hard drive. It’s an experience more akin to queuing in a Soviet potato queue than cascading into a world of fantasy and imagination.

Which is weird. Because this is the entertainment industry. It’s supposed to be about pushing boundaries and making dreams


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Press Coverage from Oasis Exclusive Events

Oasis Exclusive Events

Oasis Social Boutique Launch

The exciting news last week was that we launched our first ever Social Boutique with Oasis, the leading British contemporary fashion brand.

‘Oasis Exclusive Events’ is a new channel for Oasis to promote its products via fans and followers of the brand. The first campaign, called ‘We’ve Got You Covered’, featured six fashionable women’s coats from the new season range, with the incentive that the top three people referring friends and family would get their coat for free.

The event ran from the 22nd to the 27th October and was covered in the marketing and retail press and here is a summary of some of the highlights from The Drum, Marketing Week, .rising, Essential Retail and Retail Systems:

The Drum Logo

The Drum reported on the Oasis 'social commerce drive to incentivise fans to promote the high-street fashion retailer to friends and family’ using ‘Buyapowa’s social boutique e-commerce tool’.

Briony Garbett, head of customer experience and e-commerce at Oasis, was quoted as saying “We’re really excited to be launching this social campaign so we can give our most loyal fans exclusive rewards and access to our products. We want to connect with our


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by Peter

DIRECT TO CONSUMER: WHY BRANDS NEED TO PUT THEIR PRODUCTS ON PEDESTALS, NOT SHELVES

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Quick. Think of a brand of vacuum cleaner. If you thought “Dyson”, you’re not alone.

But it’s a different story over on Amazon UK’s Upright Vacuums landing page. You’d expect Dyson to dominate but, in its default “sort by popularity” view, you have to scroll way, way down - past dust-suckers from Gtech, Morphy Richards, Zanussi and Bissell - before you get to a single product from Sir James & Co. Now, there are probably very good reasons why that works for Amazon (who control the algorithm governing that page-view), but it’s obviously less than ideal for a brand who famously obsess over its R&D, production and marketing only to finds its positioning diluted by the promotion of their competitors.

So, what do you do when retail’s no longer your best friend? Well, there’s really only one option: you start selling direct. Ecommerce has rewritten the playbook for Direct to Consumer (or ‘D2C’). Where once it meant clunky mail-order, 28-day delivery windows and fulfilment courtesy of a man with a van, it now means state-of-the-art payment processing, next day shipping and as many whizz-bang plug-ins as your server can handle. More


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