HOW TO: drive shoppers into physical stores using social

sign

Do you work in retail? Does the word 'multichannel' feature in your title or your job spec? Then you probably spend every working hour figuring out how to harmonise your online and offline offerings: developing strategies, finding synergies and delivering sales across channels.

But I bet you've ignored social - especially when it comes to using social to deliver sales instore.

Don't worry. It's not too late to start, and we're going to give you some fuss-free ideas any retailer can implement which are guaranteed to make a real difference. Sounds good? Then, let's go...

We’ve all seen how social can dramatically expand reach, decrease acquisition costs and drive sales (just flick through this blog for 1001 examples). And social is, essentially, a digital medium - so it makes a certain amount of sense that it should be used to guide potential customers to digital destinations. But only using social to power e-commerce is like only using your car to drive to streets beginning with vowels: a massive underuse of available resources.

Of course, if you do want to use social to help your physical offering, you need to focus on footfall. Footfall is everything in the world of


▸ Continue reading

Entertainment retail in 2015: as much fun as a Soviet potato queue

Entertainment retail: about as much fun as a Soviet potato queue

Why is it that one of the most creative industries on the planet chooses to sell their wares in such a boring unimaginative way? Entertainment retail has been ripe for reinvention for a long time, so thank goodness the studios are finally stepping up and having a go.

When it comes to selling online, the entertainment industry has always been more “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn” than “I’m gonna make him an offer he can’t refuse.” You take your product - be it a movie, an album, a book, whatever - you chuck the packshot next to an ‘add to basket’ button and you wait for Joe Schmo to come along and purchase. From Joe’s point of view, he browses or searches, he clicks and fills in some forms, then he waits - either for a package to land on his doormat or a download to land on his hard drive. It’s an experience more akin to queuing in a Soviet potato queue than cascading into a world of fantasy and imagination.

Which is weird. Because this is the entertainment industry. It’s supposed to be about pushing boundaries and making dreams


▸ Continue reading

Singing for their supper: why casual dining needs to change

free_meal2

In my wallet, I have two 30% off coupons for Pizza Express. Alongside them, I’ve got some random membership card that entitles me to 40% off at Pizza Express. Oh, and… hang on, yep, here it is: another Pizza Express saver - this time a £10 voucher earned with supermarket loyalty points. That’ll keep the toddler in “Pat A Pony” pizzas for the next few weekends (he seriously needs to learn how to pronounce the word “pepperoni”).

Thing is, I didn’t have to do anything to get these coupons. I didn’t scrub dishes in their kitchens, or win some kind of competition. I didn’t even have to like pizza (I’m ambivalent). Pizza Express just gave them to me because that’s what casual dining chains do these days. They discount. Relentlessly. Aggressively. Dementedly. To the point where it’s no longer about attracting new business or inculcating loyalty, it’s simply a matter or keeping up with the Jones. Or, to be more precise, the Garfunkels, the Carluccios and the, um, Nandoses.

The rest of retail already went through this and - thank god - is finally starting to come out the other end.


▸ Continue reading

Why Tesco's customers love social shopping

Tesco Wine Co-buys

We love a good Co-buy. Well, we would. So, we were chuffed that Tesco's Co-buying channel, powered by our ground-breaking SaaS platform, appeared in Tesco's Wine Magazine this month, and is equally loved by their customers. 

Tesco Wine Co-buys

Social shopping is a great way to harness the power of social activity. Don't believe us? Listen to what your potential customers have to say! We love that Michael gets his vote in on the next bottle to be featured and that Paula is now sitting on 170 bottles of Tempranillo. Customers love to feel that they have a voice, are getting a great deal, and that they have the power to foward treats on to others.

In one recent Co-buy, Tesco's customers bagged a beaty of a bargain, with up to 47% off a case. Customers shifted 100 cases of wine in 2 hours by sharing the link to their purchse with friends and family. Everyone's a winner.

We're super proud of our cutting-edge social sales platform, and love to show it off. If you'd like to have a chat about what Buyapowa could do for you, then book a Demo.


▸ Continue reading

Entertainment retail in 2014: less fun than a Soviet potato queue

Entertainment retail: about as much fun as a Soviet potato queue

Why is it that one of the most creative industries on the planet chooses to sell their wares in such a boring unimaginative way? Entertainment retail has been ripe for reinvention for a long time, so thank goodness the studios are finally stepping up and having a go.

When it comes to selling online, the entertainment industry has always been more “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn” than “I’m gonna make him an offer he can’t refuse.” You take your product - be it a movie, an album, a book, whatever - you chuck the packshot next to an ‘add to basket’ button and you wait for Joe Schmo to come along and purchase. From Joe’s point of view, he browses or searches, he clicks and fills in some forms, then he waits - either for a package to land on his doormat or a download to land on his hard drive. It’s an experience more akin to queuing in a Soviet potato queue than cascading into a world of fantasy and imagination.

Which is weird. Because this is the entertainment industry. It’s supposed to be about pushing boundaries and making dreams


▸ Continue reading