The importance of friend incentives in referrals according to Harvard University et al

What harvard can teach you about referral incentives

Sometimes clients and prospects ask us whether they really need to give an incentive to a referred friend. As if giving an incentive will attract the wrong type of bargain hunting customer? Or, where you feel your product or service is high quality, then surely the recommendation of the friend should be enough? Particularly, if your service is invite-only, like a private shopping club.

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Why you need to jump towards referral marketing

Brands need to leap towards referral marketing and add it to their digital marketing mix

You’ve heard of the boiling frog theory, right? Put a frog in boiling water and it’ll jump right out. But put it in cold water, then slowly bring that water to boil, and Mr. Frog will happily sit there until he’s cooked to death.

It’s completely wrong, of course. Put a frog anywhere and it’ll jump out – that’s just what frogs do – but, as a metaphor, the boiling frog theory’s pretty helpful. Because, as people, we act like boiling frogs all the time: unaware that the circumstances surrounding us are getting more urgent, but failing to do anything about it until it’s too late.

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What Yale University and UC Berkeley can teach you about Word of Mouth Marketing

You wouldn’t be surprised to hear Buyapowa evangelizing how word of mouth is the most effective marketing there is because, well, it is. Of course, we’ve spent the last seven years perfecting what we think is the best enterprise referral marketing platform available, so we might be a little biased. But when two of America’s most prestigious universities, Yale and UC Berkeley, publish research on the effectiveness of word of mouth, we think that is worth a few moments of your time.

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Our latest guide to the most interesting things happening in the world of advocacy marketing

1. COVID-19 and its surprising effect on influencer marketing

It’s easy to assume with coronavirus forcing millions to stay home that social media and influencer marketing would be thriving. But, not even influencer marketing is immune to the huge cultural shift caused by the pandemic. In such serious times, creating culturally appropriate sponsored content can be a fine line to walk. Influencers risk looking oblivious if they carry on business-as-usual and insensitive if they try to incorporate the virus into their content. And, given the current economic climate, brands are reluctant to invest in strategies that may not pay off. In response to this change, top-tier influencers are lowering their rates in their quest for work, and micro-influencers are now going up against larger influencers for partnerships, creating competition that’s bad for influencers but good for brands. Meanwhile, some industry insiders are more optimistic: a new report from Influencer Intelligence revealed that spending on cheaper goods and luxuries usually increases during times of economic crisis. And, with online spending and social media use up, there’s no shortage of customers looking for entertainment and escape. So while influencers will have to deal with canceled events and limited content opportunities, the current situation could just spark a new wave of influencer creativity. Read the full article.

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Trust Based Relationship Selling for the Digital Age

Trust is one of the most important factors in maintaining a successful relationship with your customers. It can boost sales, give your company an edge over the competition, but above all – it is the driving force behind brand loyalty.

The problem is, brand-customer trust cannot be established with the press of a button. With all the spam and phishing scams floating around, how do you let your audience know they can feel secure and comfortable doing business with you?

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